Fire & Finance Blog

Fire & Finance Blog

Semi-Employed

Working from Home

In 2016, on days they worked, 22 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, according to new data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Among workers age 25 and over, those with an advanced degree were more likely to work at home than were persons with less education--43 percent of workers with an advanced degree performed some work at home on days worked, compared with 12 percent of those with a high school diploma.

This tracks with recent employer data showing that working from home has become a popular way to introduce flexibility into the working lives of professionals.

Of course, not all work-from-home situations are the same. Some workers bring home the work they can’t finish at the office. This arrangement is more about being overworked than it is about flexibility.

However, some employers build the option of working from home into the employment contract. Working at home – at least some of the time – allows employees to both reduce the amount of time wasted by commuting and to maximize their work/life balance.

So, there’s a “good” working from home and a “bad” working from home.

Semi-Employed

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